Hill Center Green Hills receives Middle Tennessee ASLA Honor Award

20 11 2009

Streetscape

Underground Rainwater Harvesting Tanks

No Curbs with Filter Strips

The Middle Tennessee Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architecture recently presented Hawkins Partners, Inc. a 2009 Honor Award in the environmental/urban design category for its work on the Hill Center in Green Hills.

Hollie Cummings, executive director of ASLA Tennessee Chapter, was quoted in an article in the Tennessean (Hill Center wins architecture award for urban design) saying, “The jury appreciated the use of details that served to unify the development and resulted in a cohesive design solution.”

HPI was involved in the planning, design, and construction of this infill redevelopment project located in Green Hills. The 220,000 s.f. mixed-use development consists of retail, restaurant, and office space. Site design elements include a pedestrian activated streetscape, which consists of wide sidewalks for shoppers, places for people to sit and relax or visit with friends, and outdoor dining along a tree-lined boulevard.

Sustainability played a big role in the design process. HPI collaborated with the design team to provide 100% improvement in the stormwater treatment over the previous site conditions. The site captures rainwater in a 25,000 gallon underground tank for use in irrigating the landscape (comprised primarily of native plants), and also utilizes new bioretention areas, which slow and reduce runoff – ultimately helping lower the temperature of runoff into the nearby Sugartree Creek. Some other items include a white roof on the Whole Foods store, over 60% of the parking is provided by covered structures and all the site lighting utilizes cut-off luminaires to reduce light pollution.

This project also won the Excellence in Development Award presented by Urban Land Institute (ULI).

– Kelly Copeland





Deaderick Street’s Transformation

28 10 2009

The Tennessee Urban Forestry conference was in town recently and asked Hawkins Partners to give a guided tour of the Nashville Public Square and Deaderick Street. This marked our first “official” tour of Deaderick Street to discuss all of the exciting new aspects of the green street.

Deaderick_Street_3

The recent transformation of Deaderick Street recalls the historic importance of the street and enhance the corridor’s prominence as an important civic axis. Prior to the renovations, the street had become most widely known as the central transfer point for the Metro bus system. In the Fall of 2008 the bus system’s hub was relocated one block over to the ambitious Music City Central, presenting an opportunity to re-envision the street itself

Deaderick_Street_4

The renovations to the street primarily focused on addressing stormwater issues and urban trees. The existing streetscape was home to an assortment of unhealthy trees ranging in sizes from 2” caliper up to 24”+. Each and every one of them were shoehorned into a 4’x4’ planting zone and struggling to adapt to urban conditions. The renovations included removing those trees and providing larger and deeper planting areas that would not only give a larger volume of soil for the tree roots, but also provide many areas in which the stormwater could travel to, thus reducing the loads into the storm system. Bioretention zones were implemented in pedestrian bulbs at the intersections and in relation to the existing catch basins. These planting areas were also excavated to a depth that would accept enough engineered soils to allow infiltration and planted with plants that can adapt to the extremes of wet and dry conditions. Pervious area within the corridor was increased by over 700%.

Deaderick_Street_1

Many other elements of sustainability were included, such as:

  • Crushed and recycled concrete used for the pavement subbase,
  • Fly ash utilized in the concrete mix,
  • Porous concrete,
  • LED light fixtures,
  • Native and drought tolerant plant materials,
  • Solar powered parking meters,
  • Water efficient irrigation system,
  • Many local vendors and fabricators,
  • The addition of bike racks to help encourage a healthier way to travel, and
  • The addition of recycling receptacles along the street.

We’re hoping that in the near future, permanent retail kiosks that were proposed in the master plan will be added to the street, further enlivening the corridor. Those kiosks are proposed to have an extensive greenroof on each. In addition, the master plan identified areas for future free standing retail buildings and liner buildings that could be added on the blank facades.

– Laura Schroeder